Zigzag stitch the binding to the fleece, making sure to catch both binding long edges with the stitches. Do your overlapping in the middle of your unfinished area. I join my binding strips with a diagonal seam and press the strips in half along the length (wrong sides together) to create a double-fold binding. It is ideal for small items like placemats, where you want a narrow binding. Fold the binding strip up diagonally to form 45 degree angle at the crease as shown in the image below (45 degree angle). The underside of the foot has a deeper section and section with regular thickness. I have an easy method for binding an inside (inverted) corner to share with you today. Eliminate corners. If the binding encases all four sides of the blanket, folding a mitered corner can provide a neat, geometric look. Check to make sure that none of the seams on the binding strips are in the corners. One of the great frustrations you may run into when you bind your quilts is achieving a perfect mitered corner — that is, a corner with a beautiful, crisp 45-degree angle that ends in a sharp point. I use the Walking foot #50 to keep the multiple layers from shifting when sewing bias binding. All you need to do to finish the binding is to fold over the binding to the other side of the quilt and then sew into the seam that you created with the first round of stitching. Stay tuned for more tutorials coming up. For small quilt projects, this is very easy to do. Instead, simply insert your fabric in the middle then stitch all layers neatly in one go. Now, lay the ends of your binding strips face to face at a right angle, and pin securely. The foot is best reserved for straight-line machine quilting, including most stitch in the ditch methods and quilting large, gently curved lines. An adjustable binding foot can be used for straight fabrics, curves and outside corners. The first tutorial for bias binding, including basic edges and outside corners. If you have ever used a binding foot, you know that corners are not easy to maneuver. Binding and presser foot alignment when quilt is trimmed 1/8″ outside the quilt top. I’ve been working on a project that has involved a LOT of bias tape. • Attach the 38 mm Binding Attachment #88 and Foot #95/95C to your sewing machine. Place the raw edges of your binding lined up along the raw edge of your quilt. Make this stitch line close to the edge of the binding… I used the Interchangeable Dual Feed Foot but this time, I used the Changeable Zigzag Foot… Do this all the way down the side, stopping a few inches from the corner. Make sure your seam allowance is wider than your reinforcing stitching line. Slide the quilt out from under the foot slightly so you can fold the binding strip. The first being that you cannot pivot around corners if you have more than one needle in. Finish sewing bias. This gives you the most room to work and easier to handle under the machine. Do the same when you end the hemming of a square piece of fabric and reach starting point. Match raw edges of the binding to the raw edge of your project and secure with a straight stitch (for this binding I am sewing with a 1/4″ seam allowance). What to do with the Corners: You have several choices for continuing. Tip: 3: Use a walking foot to attach your binding. Now we’re going to sew the binding strip to the quilt top. I find binder clips are helpful to hold things in place. When you’ve got it laid out right, pin just the starting edge so you know where to start. The white lines indicate my new edges. This time, when you machine stitch the binding to the quilt, you’re going to stitch the binding to the BACK of the quilt. • Load the bias binding strip into the binding attachment with the wrong side of the fabric showing. Repeat for all four corners. 5. 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